According to fancy color diamond traders Leibish & Co., vivid yellow diamonds have appreciated by 170% over the past 10 years. And unlike white stones that have shown considerable volatility in price over the last decade, fancy yellows tend to rise at a steady rate year after year. Read all about those who ere lucky enough to find yellow stones. 

Tiffany and Co. have long been associated with fancy yellow diamonds and had an exclusivity agreement to purchase Ellendale's fancy yellow diamonds. Yellow diamonds have been part of the Tiffany identity since 1878, when founder Charles Lewis Tiffany bought a 287.42-carat fancy yellow rough stone. The rough stone was cut into a cushion-shape weighing 128.54 carats with 82 facets and was named the Tiffany Diamond.

The largest vivid yellow diamond ever found has had a somewhat more mysterious journey. Discovered in the Kimberly region of South Africa and first announced in March 2007, the stone would be named 'The Sun of Africa.' The finished gem weighed over 127 carats. However, the whereabouts of the diamond after it was finished are unknown, except perhaps to the buyer and seller. Hopefully this magnificent stone will reveal itself again in the future.

In 1977 a man named George Stepp of Arkansas found a vivid yellow diamond at the Crater of Diamonds State park. Crater of Diamonds is the world's only publicly-owned diamond site where visitors may search for diamonds and other gems and keep what they find, regardless of the value of the stone. The stone has remained uncut to this day and has become the unofficial symbol of the state. It was worn twice by Hillary Rodham Clinton during the inauguration of Bill Clinton, both as governor of Arkansas and as President of the United States. It was sold by Stepp to Stan Kahn of Kahn Jewelers who is still the owner of the diamond.

According to fancy color diamond traders Leibish & Co., vivid yellow diamonds have appreciated by 170% over the past 10 years. And unlike white stones that have shown considerable volatility in price over the last decade, fancy yellows tend to rise at a steady rate year after year.